Keynote Speakers

Jung-Ik Ha

Seoul National University

Progress, Status, and Challenges in Electric Motor Drive Technology

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Biography

Jung-Ik Ha (Fellow, IEEE) received the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Seoul National University, South Korea, in 1995, 1997, and 2001, respectively. From 2001 to 2002, he was a Researcher with YASKAWA Electric Corporation, Japan. From 2003 to 2008, he was with SAMSUNG Electronics, South Korea, as a Senior and Principal Engineer. From 2009 to 2010, he was the Chief Technology Officer with LS MECAPION, South Korea. Since 2010, he has been with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Seoul National University where he is currently a Professor. He is also with Seoul National University Electric Power Institute, Seoul. From 2016 to 2017, he was a Visiting Scholar with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MA, USA, and the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Power Electronics, Springer. He is the vice president of the Korean Institute of Power Electronics and the director of inter-university collaborative research centers funded by SAMSUNG, LG, and Hyundai. He has authored more than 300 papers and patents published on power electronics and motor drives. His current research interests include circuits and control in high efficiency and integrated electric energy conversions for various industrial fields.

Lecture Summary

Many motor drive researchers have improved performance and competitiveness – including the size, efficiency, control bandwidth, functions, and costs in various energy conversion applications. The technological improvement of the permanent magnet, core material, water cooling, and design method has enabled high power-density and efficient motors. The technologies of wide-bandgap power devices, digital signal processing, control theory, and information also have opened high-performance inverter generations. Moreover, machine learning technology is accelerating the functionality and performance improvement of motor drives. This talk will review our recent progress and status in motor drives and explore challenges and future in motor drives.  

Shuo Wang

University of Florida

Advances and Challenges in the Modeling and Suppression of Electromagnetic Interference for Power Electronics Systems

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Biography

Shuo Wang received a Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from Virginia Tech, a Master’s degree from Zhejiang University, and a Bachelor’s degree from Southwest Jiaotong University. He is a tenured full professor with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL.

Dr. Wang’s research interests include power electronics, electromagnetic interference, electromagnetic compatibility, electromagnetic security, cybersecurity, and hardware security. Dr. Wang has more than 20 years of research experience in the modeling, measurement, and suppression of EMI for power electronics systems. He has been an IEEE Fellow since 2019.

Dr. Wang has published more than 250 IEEE journal and conference papers and holds more than 30 pending/issued US/international patents. He received the Best Transaction Paper Award from the IEEE Power Electronics Society in 2006, two William M. Portnoy Awards from the IEEE Industry Applications Society in 2004 and 2012, and the Distinguished Paper Award from the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy in 2022. In 2012, he received the National Science Foundation CAREER Award. He is an Associate Editor for the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRY APPLICATIONS and IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTROMAGNETIC COMPATIBILITY. He was a technical program Co-Chair for the IEEE 2014 International Electric Vehicle Conference.

Lecture Summary

Modern power electronics systems employ switching-mode power conversion to achieve high power density and efficiency. However, the switching mode power conversion leads to high Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) noise, which can compromise the proper operation of power converters and the electronics circuits nearby, resulting in safety, reliability, and stability issues. Recently, due to the wide adoption of wide bandgap (WBG) devices, the switching speeds and switching frequencies of the power conversions have significantly increased, resulting in higher EMI not only in the conventional conductive EMI frequency range but also in the radiated EMI frequency range. Due to the lack of understanding of EMI in power electronics systems, conventional EMI suppression and EMI filter design mostly follow a trial-and-error approach, which is ineffective and costly. EMI modeling theory has been developed to help researchers and engineers understand the generation and propagation of EMI and its relationship to the operations of power conversions. Based on the developed EMI models, cost-effective EMI suppression techniques can be developed. For this important topic, this presentation will introduce the most recent advances in EMI modeling and suppression techniques and the EMI challenges due to the high speed of WBG devices in power electronics systems.

Makoto Takamiya

The University of Tokyo

Injecting Digital into Power Electronics via Gate Driver ICs

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Biography

Makoto Takamiya received the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electronic engineering from the University of Tokyo, Japan, in 1995, 1997, and 2000, respectively. In 2000, he joined NEC Corporation, Japan, where he was engaged in the circuit design of high speed digital LSI's. He joined University of Tokyo, Japan in 2005, where he is now a Professor of Institute of Industrial Science. From 2013 to 2014, he stayed at University of California, Berkeley as a visiting scholar. His research interests include the digital gate driver and sensor ICs for power electronics and the integrated power management circuits for automotive and industrial applications. He is an elected member of administrative committee in IEEE Solid-State Circuits Society from 2023 to 2025. He is a member of the technical program committee of IEEE Symposium on VLSI Technology and Circuits, IEEE Asian Solid-State Circuits Conference, and IEEE International Symposium on Power Semiconductor Devices and ICs. He was a Distinguished Lecturer of IEEE Solid-State Circuits Society from 2019 to 2020. He received 2009 and 2010 IEEE Paul Rappaport Awards and the best paper award in 2013 IEEE Wireless Power Transfer Conference.

Lecture Summary

In order to enhance the value of power electronics and provide new services to users in the future, it will be necessary to "digitalize power electronics" by collecting data deep inside circuits and devices using various sensors and changing the operation of circuits and devices adaptively by analyzing such data.

The gate terminals of power devices are the key interface in the digitalization of power electronics, because the gate terminals serve as an intermediary between the "world of information technology and control" operating at low voltages of 5 V or less, and the "world of power electronics" operating at high voltages.

In this talk, "digital gate driver IC" and "sensing technology for power devices via gate terminals integrated in gate driver IC" will be introduced as examples of research to realize "digitalization of power electronics" via gate terminals.

Digital gate driver ICs can break the trade-off between switching loss and switching noise (surge, EMI) by changing the gate current waveform that drives power devices.

In "sensing technology via gate terminal," the collector/drain current, junction temperature, and bond wire lift-off of power devices can be estimated by monitoring the gate voltage waveform of the power devices. Since these sensor circuits are integrated into gate driver ICs, they have the advantage of small area and low cost.

Issa Batarseh

University of Central Florida

Energy Access and Energy Transition: Challenges and Opportunities

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Biography

Issa Batarseh is currently a Pegasus Professor of electrical engineering in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Central Florida (UCF) and serving as the director of the Florida Power Electronics Center. His research interests focus on energy conversion technologies in high-frequency, high-efficiency, and smart grid-tied PV energy conversion systems. His research team has been leading the design, development, and commercialization of smart microinverters and other technologies. He has published more than 100 journals, 450 conference papers, and 37 Issued US Patents, and graduated 43 Ph.D. students and 45 MS students. He is a book author entitled “Power Electronics – Circuit Analysis and Design”, 2nd Edition, Springer 2018. Was the recipient of the University Pegasus Professor, highest academic honor, and received the IEEE PELS R. David Middlebrook Achievement award. He has co-founded three start-up companies. He is a Fellow of the IEEE and AAAS, a member of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI), and has been inducted into the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame. Dr. Batarseh is a Registered Professional Engineer in the State of Florida.

Lecture Summary

Energy access and energy transition rapid changes underway are expected to bring opportunities in new technology solutions in integrated PV solar, battery storage, electrified transportation, and microgrids. This is why solar energy conversion technologies and energy storage systems will play a major role in any future sustainable solution. Years of human ingenuity with governmental and industrial support have reduced the electricity cost from solar and wind sources to match that from natural gas. In this talk, Dr. Batarseh will discuss the emerging power electronics and power systems technologies and their role in transforming the grid into a more distributed configuration will require system capabilities well beyond today’s simple grid-tied PV inverters. A review of new advanced grid forming technologies that support the US’s energy transition to a renewable energy-based future, to enable higher penetration of solar energy into the grid by delivering integrated, efficient, and reliable solar plus storage solutions. An overview of other active research projects in grid control and energy storage at the Florida Power Electronics Research Center at the University of Central Florida will also be presented.